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The First Fruits of the Lie February 5, 2010

Posted by Henry in Tithing.
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When it comes to giving to the church I find that there are “ministers” who will go at length to “invent” all kinds of ways to exact money from church people. For example, I find it quite amazing that today people can allow themselves to be convinced that they are required to pay a first fruit monetary offering to the church. Yet there is no such requirement hinted at either explicitly or implicitly in the New Testament. In the first place how does one decide how much constitute a “first fruit” out of their weekly, fortnightly or monthly wages? Is there a scriptural benchmark to use?

In the Old Testament the Israelites were required to take the first of the first fruits of the land as an offering to the house of the Lord (Ex 34:26). But does this mean that New Testament Christians are required to do this as well and on what basis would such a conclusion be reached? It should be clear from the passage (see verse 10) that the first fruit requirement was established under covenant with Israel along with all the other statutes that Moses gave to the Israelites at that time. The statutes under the covenant were meant to be observed when Israel came into the Promised Land that God was going to give them. The reason the first fruit was required can be seen from Deu 18:1-4. In these verses we learn that the Levites were not given an inheritance in the Land of Israel because it was from this tribe that the priests were to come and their sole purpose was to minister to God and not to tend land. Therefore one of the provisions that God made for them was to require that the first fruits, literally, were to be given to them.

 Since we are not living in Old Testament times and we are not Israelites living in the Promised Land why should we then observe a covenant that was given to them? Why should Christians put themselves under a covenant that is not applicable to them in terms of benefits or consequences? To stretch the point a bit further scripture tells us in Heb 8 that Jesus is a mediator of a better covenant with better promises and the old that was made with the Israelites decays and vanishes away. Why then do you put a yoke on your neck to observe a covenant that decays and vanish away? It is worth noting however that we have freedom in Christ to give what we purpose in our hearts to give.

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Comments»

1. glasseyedave - February 27, 2010

Not to mention they had to eat their tithe before the Lord in the temple. If they had to much and couldn’t travel they had to sell their goods so they could buy them all over again and eat before the Lord. On the seventh year they were to leave it in the city or town they lived in for the stranger among them along with the poor. What pastor teaches this?
Also if tithing was as important to the early church as leaders today say, why was it not put in the letter to the gentile believers. That would have been a great time to mention it. Instead we get, don’t eat meat sacrificed to idols, don’t drink blood and don’t be sexually impure. That is it, bottom line!

2. thulani - March 27, 2011

iwant to get more of the informatoin about the word,special for the first fruit,iwould like have more.

3. Henry - March 29, 2011

thulani,
Thanks for dropping by. I am not sure what further information you require. I think perhaps you are struggling with whether or not you are supposed to give a first fruit offering. The golden rule to apply here though is that the church is not under ANY obligation to observe things established under the Old Covenant with ancient Israel. That covenant has been abolished with Christ’s death and we are now under a New Covenant. In the New Covenant you will not see ANY requirement to give a first fruit offering to anyone. This requirement is simply being used as a deceitful means to exact money out of church folk.

In the new covenant there is no benchmark pertaining to what an individual should give to the church. Paul says to give according to what you purpose in your heart. It is for you to decide how much to give, and not for anyone to tell you how much you must give.

4. thulani - April 2, 2011

thanks verymuch about reviling my rights about first fruit,im in the new covernant.the ather thing ineed to know about is TITHE because i only find one-ves-in our Testament,tells about how David gave spoil to the Prist.thanks

5. thulani - April 2, 2011

Thank verymuch for expanding my knowlege obout first fruit,now i only find it defficult in terms of giving Tithe in my church,because i only find one-ves-talking about David giving His Spoil in our new testament.thanks.

6. Henry - April 3, 2011

Thulani,
Perhaps you could look at this article I wrote. To put it simply the New Testament church is not under any obligation whatsoever to tithe. If you purpose in your heart to give a tenth of your earnings to the church then do so but you are not under any law to tithe. If you look at the early church in Acts 2 and Acts 4 you will note that they gave ALL they had to the Apostles and then the Apostles in turn redistributed these gives to everyone in the church so that no one lacked. In that church therefore no one could have been tithing because they gave all they had. Tithing today is as relevant as circumcission.

https://spiritofdiscernment.wordpress.com/2009/09/18/no-should-in-tithing/

7. thulani - October 2, 2011

can you please explain this to me,Does the Christians do sins?

8. Henry - October 3, 2011

Thulani,
The question you raised is for a different topic but nevertheless I will answer your question. Yes Christians do sin – we are not supposed to sin or practice sin but on occasion we do stumble – at least I know I do. Scripture says there is none that doeth good and sinneth not (Ecc 7:20) – This is not a licence to sin, mind you. But if we confess our sins God is faithful and just to forgive us of our sins.

Here is an article that gives a good scriptural explanation on this subject: http://home.sprynet.com/~pabco/dcs.htm


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